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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
to brownsville. everyone in this chamber will miss her. i know i speak for all of my colleagues when i michigan wish kay bailey -- when i wish kay billy hutchison the i have best in the next exciting chapter of her life. i join with my colleagues in saying to you, via condios. mr. hatch: mr. president, i want to join in thanking kay for her great service here in the united states snavment i've worked very closely with her on a wide variety of issues and i have to say there's no more fires advocate. in fact, i have to say that all of our women senators are fierce advocates and we've been greatly benefited by having them herement and kay has parved the way for -- has paved the way for autumn in of senators, both male and fe female, to become better senators. kay bailey hutch song is a great senator. she worked her guts out the whole time she was here -- and she's still here, but she's going to retire this time. and she represented texas well. and all i can say is that she's been my friend all this time, and when i needed help from her, she was always there. i tried to be there for her when she ne
at that time. i took a look at it and when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met was modeled -- bob dole and we became good friends even to this day. i asked him what are your plans. and he, without hesitating, said i'm going to be a clerk. after that i'm going to run for the state house, first opening in the commerce. that's where i'm going. i figured that's a good idea. so i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor when the territorial losses became available i ran for that office and when the state could came along i got to congress a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you came here. >> two terms in the house and in the senate. >> and then came here as a member of the house and who did you come here without that time? >> only one member of that time. >> you mentioned senator dole and the fact you were then in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service. he talks about being a friend of -- excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpso
cases not so substantially change this bill. and i thank the senator from michigan for yielding just a minute. i know the senator from new york wants to respond as well. but generally i want to say i know the senator from oklahoma is very sincere. no one literally in this chamber has worked harder to try to put more reforms and eliminate duplication. but i want to just say one thing in response. when we have emergencies in this country like when we go to war, no one comes to the floor to debate how we're going to offset $1.4 trillion worth of expense for two wars, iraq and afghanistan. when we came to the floor a couple of years ago to vote for tax cuts, many of us claimed and said at the time there would not be enough known tkhoefrpl. we had to borrow money to do that. the other side sat quietly and didn't say a word. why is it when americans, when a building is blown up in oklahoma or when the levees break in louisiana or when the worst storm in 50 years comes we have to debate an offset? this bill is not going to be offset. it's going to pass, i hope. and i understand senator cobu
baltimore. we have some rain around minneapolis and some snow around michigan. that could give was a chance for some rain tomorrow afternoon. we will be on the edge between the arctic air and the mild air. they will battle back-and-forth. we will see a chance for some rain. we'll start at 9:00 a.m. tomorrow morning. as we go through the weekend, we're right on the edge. same thing into sunday. by monday, the arctic air makes a bigger push. it will sweep through on tuesday and wednesday. we have a chance for some rain in the forecast this weekend. it will not be a washout. mostly sunny and chilly today. temperatures in the upper 40's today. for rain a 40% chance showers starting friday, saturday, and sunday. do not cancel outdoor plans. mid 50's saturday and sunday. a strong front will go through it and get this back into the chilly air tuesday and wednesday. >> a warning about a cell phone scams delivered via text. it claims the user wins a gift card. they are for either $500 or $1,000. >> these text messages that we get are designed to redirect yes not towards getting a free gift card but
political activity. and i must confess, i took a look at it. when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows that i met there was bob dole. and we became good friends, even to this day. and i asked him, what are your plans? nt, without hesitating, he said that i'm going to be a county clerk and after that i will run for the state house. that is where i'm going. and i figure that is a good idea. [laughter] i go to law school, i become the assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and then i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. [laughter] >> you are in the territorial legislature then? >> two terms in the house and part of the chair of the senate. >> and then you came here to the house. who did you come here with a time? >> only one member. >> you mentioned senator dole. the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, it is talked about being a friend of, excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpson. meeting him when he
and pennsylvania, and around michigan, already in the 30s. that's where the cool and cold air is. it's going to settle in on us tonight and throughout the day tomorrow. in fact, we're going to be a couple of degrees below average. so for tomorrow morning, coats back on, folks. and button them up, too. we'll start out in the 20s and low to mid-30s across the area. after a chilly, dry evening, feeling like december tomorrow. and then light showers with that next front coming in. and more rain expected saturday. especially early in the day. here's a look at your four-day forecast. the high, 47 degrees for tomorrow. so it is going to be dry. and dry also on friday. but with clouds moving in. and the possibility maybe of some showers late in the day on friday. not posting as of yet, but this weekend for sure looking like rain. saturday the high 65. sunday, 55. and that stalled-out weather front still around at the beginning of the week. the high 62. air, or major storms to deal with. >> all right. >> lovely. skirting through december. >> we can't be dreaming of a white christmas, can we. >> no, w
states are implementing these conservative ideas. we see states like michigan join us. we do not force people to join unions and economies move and want to be a part of what is happening. when you get more parents choices of education, it tells all children, low-income children, we see it all over the country. we can prove it with research prepare. when states have the right for their own energy, the revenues that come into the government help build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that is an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. this could be more efficient and do much better than we can do under the federal area. the principles of freedom are working. we need to spot like them, a showcase them, communicate them so people see that these ideas work. at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington and see that the ideas that emplace are dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, the friends of freedom in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas of american ideas, ideas we now are working th
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
, michigan, a republican caller. go ahead, frank. caller: yes. look, first of all, we need to find out like exactly who is mentally ill and who's not mentally ill and the rimets need to be like finish if someone lives in a house who is mentally ill, obviously, we cannot have weapons of any kind within their range. that's what the law should be. the law shouldn't be we shouldn't just outlaw all weapons we should just outlaw anyone who is obviously with mental issues. the guy who in virginia tech, he had a depression issue. he went to a doctor and still somehow got his hands on two .9 millimeter weapons and you can't tell me that the guy in colorado didn't have mental issue. you can just look at the guy and know that there's something wrong there. we just with to keep the weapons like out of the household or how far range for these people who have mental health. host: frank, the questions that you pose, who are the mentally ill, we will ask those types of questions tomorrow on "washington journal." we're going to have a roundtable discussion with a republican and a democrat who co chair the m
to express the fact that last night i came in to do a special order on the situation happening in michigan where a surprise attack, a sneak attack by the right wingers resulted in the passage of legislation, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one ti
: philip. michigan. democratic caller. caller: thank you. this is not so much a tax question. i used to work for a food company in 1972 that was very large, employing 3000 or more, closing in 1985. people here have lost their jobs. why does the government not do something to cut their jobs? for instance, do we really need the cia, the federal marshals here and there? why do they not get the federal bureau to cover everything? host: that is philip's idea. on twitter, a follow-up with the small-business owner we heard from, saying they eliminated business averaging which is hopeful to small businesses with fluctuating income. guest: it guest: under income averaging, if you have a fluctuating in a come -- income, you pay low rates when your income is low, high rates when your income is high. the average maybe higher than if you had constant and come over that time. income averaging the be the ability to average over years and pay tax at a rate equal to the harvard marginal rates that would apply to your average income. it was an attempt to address the fluctuating income problem. host: m
, senates from montana and michigan to come and tour the area because we are very concerned about senator -- scheduled 0 come and plan to but weather delayed to him. we have republicans and democrats with the eyes on the disasters. one of the reasons we are here today, however, to make sure that the federal government through the small business administration is doing everything in the power to assist the thousands of small businesses that have been hurt in this national disaster. by and large, the federal response has been robust to hurricane sandy. more than 500,000 people have registered for temporary houses and individual assistance, fema, there on the ground right away as provided over 15 million meals, 20 million leaders of water, -- liters of water, 1.7 million blankets and 135,000 tarps. dodd has delivered 9.3 million gasoline and 270 million gallons of salt water have been pumped out of transit tunnels. there have been over 17,000 personnel and 15,000 national gassermen. i want to thank the first responders from every level from fire houses to police stations to volunteers in the
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13